The Interactive Classroom

From Distraction to Interaction

Students don’t sit and take notes anymore. They’re interacting—on mobile devices, tablets and laptops—during class. Echo360s digital tools turns this distraction into an advantage, as a lecture classroom turns into an active learning center with a lively forum for thought-provoking discussion, personalized learning and engaging group activities. Among the many benefits of active learning:

Social learning advances progress: In discussions, collaboration and group activities, students learn from each other. In many ways, they’re teaching themselves as they engage each other with questions and work in groups to solve challenges. This “cements the material into our brains,” as one student put it.

Presentations keep interest levels high: Polls, questions and quizzes built into your in-class material are easy for students to use on any device. Our digital platforms encourage face-to-face interaction whenever possible—and full participation even for those attending online.

Questions don’t go unasked: Students who are intimidated or don’t get a chance to ask questions often begin to slip further and further behind, disengaging from learning. Echo360 makes it easier for students to ask questions anonymously, in the classroom, before or after class, or at a distance. Instructors can bundle questions together for in-class discussion or targeted after-class resource materials.

Get instant insight into student progress: There’s no guesswork for instructors trying to assess students’ progress and comprehension using analytics built into Echo360 solutions. Whether it’s a whole class or individual students, learning analytics give you the feedback you need to tailor your instruction and keep everyone on track.

See the benefits of active learning at work in this video.

 
Download Lecture Tools (pdf) Download How it Works (pdf) View Michigan State Case Study

I was frustrated by the lack of engagement in my big lecture class. With Lecture Tools, they have to engage with the material.

Dr. Melissa Gross,
Associate Professor,
University of Michigan